Education
Rehabilitation
Research
Sanctuary
Above, Rough-legged Hawk © 2011 Paige Calamari, used with permission from Central Michigan Life.
This rough-legged hawk was released following rehabilitation at WRA. Note the feathers all the way to the toes. "Peaches" was so named for her peach colored underside.

WHO WE ARE

Wildlife Recovery Association is dedicated to promoting the understanding, appreciation and protection of wild raptors and their connection with nature.

 

Introduction

Wildlife Recovery Association was incorporated in 1979 to provide services for and about wildlife and promote a better understanding of their needs. We provide quality educational outreach programs with live birds of prey, participate in research and management programs to support rare and endangered species, and provide care for orphaned and injured hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons.

 

EDUCATION

Education is Schools

Wildilfe Recovery Association travels to many schools to inspire students to pursue their goals in science, math, journalism, and the arts.

Our goals in education are primarily to help people understand, appreciate, and protect wild hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons, and their connection with all of nature.

We also incorporate many science concepts into our school programs, inspiring students to learn more: to think critically, to write well, to sharpen observation skills, and to incorporate art, music, and journalism into their educational goals.

 

REHABILITATION

We provide rehabilitation services to injured and orphaned hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons.

Our veterinarian, Dr. White, has 30 years of experience working with birds of prey.  In addition, we   work with several veterinarians in various parts of Michigan.

Housing for recovering birds includes 5 flight cages from 30 feet in length to 100 feet.

A network of volunteers assists with transport of injured birds when necessary.

We often work with law enforcement agencies whose employees assist in the rescue of birds of prey.

We work with many law enforecement agencies such as conservation officers, police officers, and sheriff departments who assist in rescuing these incredible birds.

We work with many law enforcement agencies such as conservation officers, police officers, and sheriff deputies who assist in rescuing these incredible birds. In this photo, a conservation officer from northeastern Michigan captured and delivered to us an injured bald eagle. (Released in summer of 2015)

 

RESEARCH, MANAGEMENT, AND MONITORING

For almost 30 years, we assisted with the reintroduction of peregrine falcons at wild sites in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  Now, we monitor peregrine nesting areas to ensure their continued ability to thrive and produce young peregrines.  We also encourage citizen science, projects such as nest box construction, and we support university research projects.

Thirty years of field research has helped tremendously in understanding these magnificent birds. Here, a peregrine falcon flies past as we watch from the cliff.

Thirty years of field research has helped tremendously in understanding these magnificent birds. Here, a peregrine falcon flies past as we watch from the cliff.

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Have you ever seen a pileated woodpecker eat berries? Is this a treat ?...or is this a substiture for insect larvae that is difficult to find? ... See MoreSee Less

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Have you ever seen a pileated woodpecker eat berries? Is this a treat ?...or is there limited food available (insects, grubs, etc.)? Your thoughts? ... See MoreSee Less

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Just an update: The snowy owl from MBS International Airport has had her surgery and is doing well. Thanks to the guys from the MBS fire station who rescued her, to Dr. White, who did the surgery, and to TV5 news who are sharing the story. Thank you all. ... See MoreSee Less

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3 weeks ago

Wildlife Recovery Association

...and we were given a snowy owl. From MBS International Airport... this snowy had a fractured wing, and really needed help. And we are grateful for this gift and the opportunity to help her heal. ... See MoreSee Less

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Two more days...…….. and thank you to all who have already donated. When you do help out this way, you are providing funds for the care of many hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons - we care for almost 100 of these magnificent birds each year. And you assist with the funding of our educational programs - reaching about 30,000 people each year. If you use our paypal (on our web site at wildliferecovery.org under membership) your contribution is processed quickly, and will be matched through a grant from The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation for the 2019 budget. Thank you soooo much! -Barb Rogers & Wildlife Recovery Association Team ... See MoreSee Less

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4 weeks ago

Wildlife Recovery Association

JUST 5 MORE DAYS! If you make a donation within 5 days that is new funding, it will be matched by The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation for our 2019 budget. Please use Paypal on our web site (wildliferecovery.org) under membership for quick processing. THANKS! -Barb Rogers & Wildlife Recovery Association TEAM ... See MoreSee Less

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If you are going to the State Fair in Escanaba, we will be there with our Birds of Prey program ONLY on Friday, August 17th. Hope to see you there! -Barb ... See MoreSee Less

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5 months ago

Wildlife Recovery Association

Year of the Snowy...…..we took another group of snowy owls north for the release and released them when it was still dark - took them about as far north towards Canada as we could get. In July. And we are still getting calls. In the following photos, you will see our most recent releases, a glimpse of some of the snowy owls in the flight cage (we have had up to five at a time in the flight cage, but I hesitate to put more in there, as they could argue over food), and one of the recent contacts on a snowy owl that is still here in Michigan. We don't doubt that there will be many again next year that need help. -Barb ... See MoreSee Less

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6 months ago

Wildlife Recovery Association

A few more photos as promised. I am not sure where all of these are, just know that if you plan a trip up there, check with friends, relatives, and anyone you know in the UP before trying to get there. Much of the UP is down with power outages, and flooded roads. Most of the damage is up in the Keeweenaw, but other parts are pretty rough. One person was airlifted to Ann Arbor with injuries. Because the back roads are not accessable, there may be more injuries than what we know of now. Take Care all you Yoopers. ... See MoreSee Less

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Apparently we made it out just in time. The northern part of the UP was flooded after the storm. Many roads are out. Michigan Tech (our daughter works there) is closed. You can see from the photo that Highway 2, the one along the northern part of Lake Michigan has been washed out at this site. The road is the thin grey line; the washout is the curved sandy colored area. Roads in the Keeweenaw are really bad; hospitals, courthouse, everything, basically is closed. I will give you an update with more photos (sent by our daughter) this afternoon.
We were lucky to get in to the peregrine site when we did; it is very likely that the nest that we observed will have been destroyed by the storm. We have not heard of any serious injuries or fatalities to people; they are just looking at the damage with awe. Many, whose houses are intact, have opened their doors to others who are not so fortunate. Looks like the aftermath of an earthquake. Take Care, everyone.
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