Education
Rehabilitation
Research
Sanctuary
Above, Rough-legged Hawk © 2011 Paige Calamari, used with permission from Central Michigan Life.
This rough-legged hawk was released following rehabilitation at WRA. Note the feathers all the way to the toes. "Peaches" was so named for her peach colored underside.

WHO WE ARE

Wildlife Recovery Association is dedicated to promoting the understanding, appreciation and protection of wild raptors and their connection with nature.

 

Introduction

Wildlife Recovery Association was incorporated in 1979 to provide services for and about wildlife and promote a better understanding of their needs. We provide quality educational outreach programs with live birds of prey, participate in research and management programs to support rare and endangered species, and provide care for orphaned and injured hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons.

 

EDUCATION

Education is Schools

Wildilfe Recovery Association travels to many schools to inspire students to pursue their goals in science, math, journalism, and the arts.

Our goals in education are primarily to help people understand, appreciate, and protect wild hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons, and their connection with all of nature. We also incorporate many science concepts into our school programs, inspiring students to learn more: to think critically, to write well, to sharpen observation skills, and to incorporate art, music, and journalism into their educational goals.

 

REHABILITATION

We provide rehabilitation services to injured and orphaned hawks, owls, eagles, and falcons.

Our veterinarian, Dr. White, has 30 years of experience working with birds of prey.  In addition, we   work with several veterinarians in various parts of Michigan.

Housing for recovering birds includes 5 flight cages from 30 feet in length to 100 feet.

A network of volunteers assists with transport of injured birds when necessary.

We often work with law enforcement agencies whose employees assist in the rescue of birds of prey.

We work with many law enforecement agencies such as conservation officers, police officers, and sheriff departments who assist in rescuing these incredible birds.

We work with many law enforecement agencies such as conservation officers, police officers, and sheriff deputies who assist in rescuing these incredible birds. In this photo, a conservation officer from northeastern Michigan captured and delivered to us an injured bald eagle. (Released in summer of 2015)

 

RESEARCH, MANAGEMENT, AND MONITORING

For almost 30 years, we assisted with the reintroduction of peregrine falcons at wild sites in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.  Now, we monitor peregrine nesting areas to ensure their continued ability to thrive and produce young peregrines.  We also encourage citizen science, projects such as nest box construction, and we support university research projects.

Thirty years of field research has helped tremendously in understanding these magnificent birds.  Here, a peregrine falcon flies past as we watch from the cliff.

Thirty years of field research has helped tremendously in understanding these magnificent birds. Here, a peregrine falcon flies past as we watch from the cliff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Turkey Vultures have been moving through for a few weeks now, and will be looking for a place to nest. These beautiful, graceful birds will nest in tall stumps, in brush piles, in old shacks or under logs, and sometimes in a barn or hunting blind. They look for places where they can hide, usually fairly low to the ground.

If you find a nest with young (the babies are covered with white down), and don't want them nesting in that location, you can build a secondary nest - a brush pile works well - and the youngsters can be moved to the new nearby location without much disruption. We have assisted with this when the proud parents took over a hunting blind! Call us if you need help with this type of situation.

Meanwhile, enjoy watching these amazing birds in flight. They are on the move now.
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A recent eagle release..........more photos by Tim Kaufman - what an incredible sight showing the release as this eagle takes flight. ... See MoreSee Less

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This red-tailed hawk came to us with leg-hold trap injuries, but was rescued within minutes by the finder. The quick response was key to the hawks ability to be recovered.

Christy, a CMU biology student, and volunteer for WRA, was given the honor of release. Thanks fo photographer, Tim Kaufman, we have excellent photographs.

This hawk spent about two weeks in rehabiltation, and with TLC and excellent holding cages, she was able to retain perfect feathers, and excercise before release. We will soon give you a "behind the scenes" report on how this is done.

We are still receiving far more than normal numbers of hawks and owls for rehabilitation - We could use some help in purchasing food for these birds. to make a donation, please write: 531 S. Coleman Rd., Shepherd, MI 48883 THANKS!
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This red-tailed hawk came to us with leg-hold trap injuries, but was rescued within minutes by the finder. The quick response was key to the hawks ability to be recovered. Christy, a CMU biology stu...

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What better to do on Christmas Day, than to rescue a little owl (Barred Owl). Reminds us that the many emergency staff such as 911 dispatch, police, sheriff deputies, fireman, and more are still on duty on this day. Owl rescued, more updates on the way. ... See MoreSee Less

What better to do on Christmas Day, than to rescue a little owl (Barred Owl). Reminds us that the many emergency staff such as 911 dispatch, police, sheriff deputies, fireman, and more are still on d...

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Releasing the Oxbow eagle back on home territory at Chippewa Nature Center was a gift, not only to the eagle, who was very, very ready to fly free again, but a gift to the nature center staff and families who were there to see him off. And a gift to us, giving us a chance to share what we put many hours, and truly, a lifetime of effort into. Thank you Michelle and all of the nature center staff for being a part of this event. Have a wonderful Christmas and Holiday Season. Barb Rogers ... See MoreSee Less

Releasing the Oxbow eagle back on home territory at Chippewa Nature Center was a gift, not only to the eagle, who was very, very ready to fly free again, but a gift to the nature center staff and fami...

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The Oxbow Eagle is released! WNEM TV5 and Midland Daily News were there to capture the event. Watch it tonight on TV5. I will give you the full story soon. ... See MoreSee Less

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The Oxbow Eagle - doing well, perching well. More updates on other birds in our care coming soon. Thank you for your memberships and contributions! ... See MoreSee Less

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OXBOW EAGLE PHOTOS - Here is a peek at him in recovery. ... See MoreSee Less

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THE OXBOW EAGLE - a bit of an update on this beautiful bird as well as the many new patients. During most of November we have been receiving one or two raptors each day that are in need of help. Very busy here, so my ability to respond to requests are slowed down a bit. Please be patient.

The Oxbow eagle is doing fine. We moved him to a warm room - about ten to twenty degrees warmer than outdoor temps, but in a secure place where he is comfortable. He is eating well and improving daily. Check through the photos of some of the other birds that we are caring for. These are just samples- we receive one or more birds every day.

It is a time to be thankful, and we are very, very thankful for all of your support, be it donations of towels, fish and other raptor food, or funds. Also thankful for those who set up programs and invite our ambassador birds, volunteers, and those who send us birds in need of help.

Most of the birds pictured in this album are on their way to complete recovery. If you turned in a bird, and need to know the outcome, please call us (989) 772-1538. We will respond as soon as possible.

Thank you, thank you!
Wildlife Recovery Association Team
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